National Poll: On the Eve of the 2020 Election, Education Was A Priority for Voters

Executive Summary

Lake Research Partners designed and administered this election eve survey, conducted from October 31 through November 3, 2020, as part of an omnibus poll. A nationwide sample of 1,200 voters who voted in the 2020 general election, or who were planning to vote before the polls closed on election day, answered questions about the role education played in their voting decisions.

Key Findings

69%


of voters say public education was important in deciding their vote in the 2020 Presidential election.

74%


of voters favor a stimulus plan that includes funding for state and local governments, so they can fund public schools at current levels.

55%


of rural voters strongly favor a stimulus plan that includes funding for state and local governments so they can fund public schools at current levels.

52%


of voters want to increase federal funding for public schools.

53%


of Black voters are very likely to consider education an important issue impacting their vote.

46%


of voters in states with close Senate races in 2022 say that education is an important issue impacting their vote.

49%


of voters aged 40-49 are willing to pay more in taxes in order to increase federal funding for public schools to fully meet every community’s needs.

1 in 4


are interested in volunteering their time with an organization trying to make public education a key priority.

60%


of women voters are very concerned about children falling behind in their education due to the pandemic.

The Full Breakdown

Biden and Trump Voters Agree on the Importance of Education.

63% of President-elect Biden voters and 38% of President Trump say education was very important to their vote.

Biden and Trump voters want to see increased federal funding for K-12 education, career and technical education and early childhood education. 

  • 14% of Biden voters and 32% of Trump voters say that they want the federal government to increase funding for career and technical education. 
  • 23% of Biden voters and 16% of Trump voters say that they want the federal government to increase funding for early childhood education.

Voters aged 40-49, white non college educated men, Trump voters, and rural voters are among those who are most likely to prioritize career and technical education, while white college educated men and Biden voters are among those who are most likely to prioritize early childhood education.

Voters in states with close Senate races understand the connection between robust public education and a healthy economy.

  • 76% of Biden voters in states with close Senate races in 2022 strongly favor a federal economic stimulus plan that includes funding for state and local governments so they can fund public schools at current levels.  
  • 38% of Trump voters in states with close Senate races in 2022 strongly favor a federal economic stimulus plan that includes funding for state and local governments so they can fund public schools at current levels.  
  • 61% of Independent men voting in states with close Senate races in 2022 strongly favor a federal economic stimulus plan that includes funding for state and local governments so they can fund public schools at current levels.  
  • 56% of Independent women voting in states with close Senate races in 2022 strongly favor a federal economic stimulus plan that includes funding for state and local governments so they can fund public schools at current levels.  
  • 53% of voters who say COVID-19 is a top issue affecting their vote are also very concerned about not having access to the technology needed for education during the pandemic.

Voters Are Ready for Congress to Fund Education and Energized to Get Involved

No matter party lines, geography, race or gender, voters want the federal government to invest in education. Voters are more likely to vote for a candidate who would increase funding to improve student health, make education after high school more affordable, and increase funding for childcare and early childhood education, giving every child the opportunity to attend a quality program.

  • 50% of Independent women voters in states with close races in 2022 are very likely to support a candidate who wants to fund public school repairs, student mental health and meals. 
  • 65% of Black voters are very likely to support a candidate who wants to fund quality childcare programs.
  • 55% of voters under 30 are very likely to support a candidate who wants to fund career and technical skills. 
  • 57% of Latinx voters of color are very likely to support a candidate who wants to fund schools who have the least. 
  • 50% of voters who are white, non-college educated men are very likely to support a candidate who wants to make post-secondary school more affordable.
  • 57% of Democrats under age 35 are interested in volunteering their time to make public education a key priority.

 

We are under construction!

We're currently making some updates to the Educations Champions to better reflect our mission. In the meantime, we invite you to review our past work including polling and other materials. Please check back soon for our updated site.